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20131202
20131210
Search Results 0 to 16 of about 17 (some duplicates have been removed)
of state, and former ambassador to the u.n.. dr. albright. [applause] sandy burger, former national security adviser to president clinton. sandy. [applause] leon feater, former national security adviser to vice president gore. [applause] nancy sotoburg former deputy national adviser to president clinton. [applause] and general wesley clark, former supreme allieded commander europe and director of strategic plans and policies for the joint chiefs of staff, general clark. [applause] i'd also like to recognize terry gardener, the director of the library. terry, thank you. [applause] joseph, the director of the cia information management services. [applause] skip rutherford, the dean of the public school of service. [applause] bruce lipped see, chairman of the board of the clinton foundation. [applause] former secretary of transportation rodney slater. [applause] and governor jim guy tucker. [applause] it is now my pleasure to introduce this. he was the deputy director intelligence of the cia. he was chairman of the national intelligence com and served as a assistant director of central
no military on the ground. what company, what battalion is that? we have u.n. units from different countries, serbs, muslims, they are all jabbering and we are monitoring some of it and we are hearing it from other people and that had to be kept straight and you had to know the commanders and the political level and the other nation's level so it was a huge intelligence load on them. the only suggestion i have after all that, i don't know if we are doing this any better, we are not very disciplined in the pentagon about collecting information from people who have gone out and we should be more disciplined. somebody should have chained me to the desk and said write down the name of everybody talked to, every personality, tell me the five most important things and give me strength and weaknesses. i do believe the chinese do this, the soviets did this, the israelis do this and for some reason, the state department does it but for some reason in the military we don't. we just want to know about weapons. >> we will take you on that. >> we just want to know about weapons so we don't get into the p
decade. it was very interesting because i think that one of the other things i did at the u.n. was try to make sure that sanctions stayed on iraq. that was, you had a cease fire translated into a series of captions, and those were very kind of ham handed sanctions, if i might say. the most, the toughest sanctions on any country at all, and what we were looking at through leon's help was to try to really get more surgical with the sanctions in -- on the form of yugoslavia. one of the problems that was there, because you put two things together, is that there was an arms embargo that was put on that only hurt the countries that had seceded from the seshes. the serbs had a huge standing military, and the reason we wanted to lift the embargo on arms was that the others were not getting any. there's two different aspects to this, but sanctions are a tool, and they do hurt, and the question is, how do you turn to what are known as smart sanctions to just the comprehensive ones? i think on the other questions, sandy, i mean, these documents -- >> all i have to say is that when you design a st
with our u.n. and ngo partners who have a lot of skill addicts. doing programs that basically provide a decent wage in return for clearing debris away. this would be a huge challenge, an important challenge. unfortunately or fortunately, the philippines have a fair amount of experience in dealing with debris. it is a scale issue in this sense and will be an area of the media focus has been lookahead. you've raised some of the other associated concerns about disease with debris and for that reason, the fogginess a very important approach because there's standing water. the other issue of coors is there still pulling bodies out from underneath these mountains of debris and that will likely remain an ongoing effort as they work their way through the recovery. i'm trafficking, this has been an area of concern in the philippines for some time. in fact, the united states has put about $11 million into counter trafficking programming in the philippines. we work closely with them and called the philippines interagency council for counter trafficking. there is a need to remain very vigilant ab
madeleine albright, former secretary of state and u.s. ambassador to the u.n. dr. albright. [applause] >> sandy berger former national security advisor to president clinton. sandy. [applause] >> leon fuerth, former national security advisor to vice president gore. [applause] >> nancy soderberg, former deputy national security advisor to president clinton. [applause] >> and general wesley clark, former supreme allied commander europe and director of strategic plans and policy for the joint chiefs of staff. general clark. [applause] >> i would also like to recognize the director of the clinton library. thank you. [applause] >> joseph, the director of the cia information management services. [applause] >> skip rutherford, the dean of the clinton school of public service. [applause] >> bruce lindsey, the chairman of the board of the clinton foundation. [applause] >> forward slash future of transportation rodney slater. [applause] >> and governor jim guy tucker. [applause] >> it is now my pleasure to introduce dr. john gannon. dr. gannon served as the deputy director for intelligence at th
and supported the capacity of the civilian side, both the government and the u.n. to set up land and sea bridges to help clear the roads so that we were able to wrap up the military engagement and bring forward the longer term civilian ability to ensure that the delivery were able to continue. lo jiggics were the number one focus. followed by three key priorities. emergency shelter, water sanitation, and food. there were about a million homes destroyed by the storm. we air lifted right away heavy duty plastic sheeting to the philippines that -- contribute temporary shelters. the water supply were ranched. the system were down. we focused on provision of clean water, chlorine tablet, and very quickly worked to get it up and running with the support to unreceive and by the time i was there. that was already providing 100% the water for the municipal area. the philippines government and the international community continued to -- spornd to the health concerns. there are nearly 200 health teams on the ground now and more than 2,000 children have been immunized. and withstanding water trapped in the
from the national institute of health, and michelle from u.n. aids, and debra who is carrying on the great work as the acting global aids coordinator and many friends from the philanthropic world including bill gates, so, thank you, all, for joining us here today. every year, this is a moment to reflect on how far we've come since early days of the aids end epidemic, and those of you who lived through it remember all too well the fear and the stigma and how hard people with hiv had to fight to be heard or be treated with decent compassion. you remember how little we knew how to prevent aids or how it treat it. what we knew is the devastation inflected, striking down vibrant men and women in the time of their lives spreading to city to city, country to country seemingly overnight. today, that picture has transformed thanks to the courage and love of some of you in this room and around the world awareness soars, research surged, prevention, treatment, and care save millions of lives in the richest countries and the world's poorest countries as well. for many, with testing and ac
-term. i will say that was very positive. the u.n. as well use whatever shelter models of the cluster key model into the future. the u.n. is thought that time, particularly unicef and osha are particularly strong right out of the gate. i would just reiterate this type of the dvds. i would also say as he spoke about the misrepresentative green mentioned, you sound like we've been in the same areas in pakistan and tsunami penalties stiffer and emergencies emergencies a sitcom for that i think there's been a lot of learning that has gone on. frankly this nominee was the first time we really worked closely with the american military setting up temporary bridges to get to violence and locations that were completely transfigured as the geography had changed. in haiti as well, the military came up in the philippines. i know in haiti the u.s. military tried to do with a lighter footprint, with a letter president never going in providing assistance. in the philippines from a came in, there is joy for most of the people we talked to roll around. it is very, very impressive. even in the media outlet
respecting the u.n. charter rules on when force may be used. and i also think that if we do use for -- force, we must follow through. i actually make a distinction between the conflicts in afghanistan which ugly was legal and the conflict in iraq would simply was not. very often in the u.s. especially on the left people sort of a similar these two conflict. i think they are different. when we got afghanistan wrong was then going into iraq, not spent the money on the ground for development of the people were so thirsty for. i went to afghanistan back in 2005 in so many people were so glad the taliban had been overthrown to talk about ordinary people taxi drivers, not just political activists or women rights advocates. we took our eye off the ball and didn't follow through, and now i really fear the situation where going to leave afghan in. one of the afghan women i interviewed for the book, a very prominent afghan human rights activist who lost family back in the terrible conflict in the 1990s when the international committee had forgotten what happened in the country, she said to me, look, w
and that includes ngos. it includes at least two u.n. special rapporteur's. it includes many editors around the world. >> is the fact that a 29-year-old liar, 360,000 other people can access information suggests a potential enemies have access to it, to? >> it is in the witness statement that the national security advisor has been working on that assumption since snowden disappeared with the material. >> were you shocked by the revelation of the surveillance of allies by this country in places like the g20 01? >> again, the question of the public interest, the fact that president obama effectively had to concede that his country has been again president merkel, notes a mile from australia but they were intercepting heat in his life. that was the thing that led senator frank to say she had to review what was going on with that knowledge. and then you're a member of the united states came out and said, okay, we will stop bugging these gatherings of the ims, the european parliament. we don't know. there is some specific organization. the bridge gilding and peacemaking. after the world war, the
-term. that was positive and the u.n. used the shelter model as the cluster model used in the future. and particularly unicef was particularly strong out of the gate. we have been in the same areas in pakistan, there has been a lot of learning that has gone on. the tsunami was the first time that we really worked closely with the american military setting up temporary bridges to get to islands and locations that were transfigured as the geography changed in that. in haiti the u.s. military came up in the philippines, the military tried to do it with a lighter presence and they were going out in the philippines when they came in, there was joy for most of the people we talked to. it was very impressive even in the media out let's. the fact the we had an aircraft carrier as mentioned earlier was seen as ferrying assistance back and forth, seen as assisting other countries and lift capacity was very impressive at that time. on the ground people were questioning their own governments, no one was questioning the resolve to provide assistance. i will say as comments have come about about the diaspora in the
general on behalf of the u.n. response appreciation. we appreciate you taking the time to speak to us. is there any single message that nelson has made throughout the years that run particularly true with you. and you think applies today in africa and throughout the rest of the world? one of the thing he often said was that the whole cause of freedom was still a work in progress. >> africa had many countries in the world during last century and many centuries before have suffered from this rule. and violation of the human right and human dignity. only because of such a great man like nelson mandela is possible that particular people in africa and elsewhere are able to enjoy freedom and human dignity. i'm still very much humbled. many people, particularly people -- [inaudible] totally abuse and violated. we have to learn the wisdom and determinations and commitment from all of president mandela to make this world better. that is what i really wanted to exprez my deepest admiration and respect to president mandela and people of south africa. and all people of africa. thank you very much
, the united states was then able to get the foundational u.n. security council resolutions that have been the premise for everything that has happened in the last seven 1/2 years. resolutions by the way at the beginning of 06, everyone told us we could not get. and are then the building framework for the global coalition is by the way an astonishing bipartisan diplomatic achievement. begun in 06. carried forward with great effect bit obama administration. this includes stuart levy at treasury and his successors with other officials at treasury. if you think about the global coalition, that has crippled the iranian economy, and the geopolitical significance of that coalition, and that that coalition has been created and has endured for seven 1/2 years to the, to reach to the present moment, that's an extraordinaire bipartisan accomplishment that i think has received very little notice and many of the critics today were the critics of the initial move in the spring of 06. it is worthwhile to remember how much bipartisan work and work by professional bureaucrats has been involved in erecting
. that was adopted by the u.n. general a summit on december 10, 1948. that event gets underway at 115 eastern on c-span2. [inaudible conversations] [inaudible conversations] [inaudible conversations] [inaudible conversations] [inaudible conversations] [inaudible conversations] [inaudible conversations] [inaudible conversations] >> lives once again from pew charitable trusts here in washington as we await remarks, secretary lew. you will discuss implications of the dodd-frank financial regulations law. a couple of stories from "the associated press." a number of americans applying for unemployment benefits tumbled last week, 20,000, to 298,000 nearly a six-year low. it shows companies are laying off fewer workers. applications have fallen in seven of the past eight weeks. a hopeful sign for job growth at the end of year. the white house is pushing to extend jobless benefits to long-term unemployed americans. the argument is if benefits don't get renewed by the end of the month more than 1 million people will loose the assistance which will slow economic growth. the government released a report toda
be working with is out to the u.n. there are just not the personal connections either. a group like no labels can play a real role. joe manchin was saying, this may come to surprise them in the united states senate every tuesday the senate is in session. every tuesday is a caucus lunch. republicans caucus in one room and have lunch. the democrats caucus in another room and have lunch. every thursday the policy committees of the two caucuses meet. same thing, democrats, republicans there. never, not once, literally not once, republicans and democrats meet together to discuss substantive issues. doesn't happen. and it's that way on purpose. because the leaders of the two conferences think that if there starts to be this dialogue going able to control and they can't direct the course of legislation the way they would like. and so the role no labels can play is to provide that neutral meeting ground. jon is saying you don't have to stop being a republican or democrat. we do need to start being americans. we are not going to agree on everything. that doesn't mean we can't agree on something, which
Search Results 0 to 16 of about 17 (some duplicates have been removed)